Subject: MAX Digest - 19 Mar 1999 (#1999-88)
Date: Sat, 20 Mar 1999 00:00:00 -0500
From: Automatic digest processor 
Reply-To: MAX - Interactive Music/Multimedia Standard Environments
     
To: Recipients of MAX digests 

There are 7 messages totalling 431 lines in this issue.

Topics of the day:

  1. Silly objects (Was: The new Search Utility...)
  2. tempo for MIDI files
  3. Alternate controllers, latency, and performance intimacy
  4. CD Controller
  5. using buffer~ loop sync
  6. alternative controllers
  7. IS THAT IT, MAX 3.5?

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Date:    Fri, 19 Mar 1999 16:30:50 +0100
From:    Peter Castine 
Subject: Silly objects (Was: The new Search Utility...)

On around 17-3-99 15:32, one Cointreau, on ice.... said something like:

>tinkywinky - alternate patching (need we say more?)

You forgot:

lucasfoss - mutates all patch chord timing to left-to-right.

Cheers,

Peter

----------------- http://www.prz.tu-berlin.de/~pcastine/ -----------------
Dr. Peter Castine          | I am very pleased to announce that the
4-15 Music & Technology    | 26th International Computer Music Conference
                           | will take place in Berlin in the year 2000.
                           | We look forward to seeing you here!

------------------------------

Date:    Fri, 19 Mar 1999 16:30:48 +0100
From:    Peter Castine 
Subject: Re: tempo for MIDI files

On around 16-3-99 18:10, Dmitri Tymoczko said something like:

>I use MAX to generate MIDI files, and would like to be able to control the
>file's tempo specification -- so that I can import the music correctly into
>some other program like Finale or Pro Tools.  I seem to recall that all the
>sequencer objects (including detonate) pick an arbitrary value for the
>file's tempo.

If I recall correctly, the MIDI File spec names MM 120 as default tempo
when nothing else is specified.

Max generally thinks simply in milliseconds, so you're probably getting
everything stored with 500ms = quarter note.

The difficulty is that tempo markings are not MIDI events per se. They
are "meta events" defined specifically for MIDI files (as opposed to live
midi). I haven't actually done much with detonate, but the simpler
sequencer objects don't provide a means of inputting meta events. Failing
support for meta events, you're basically stuck with q=500ms.

Sorry not to have more help. One possible (kludgy) workaround: if you
want to have algorithmically generated tempo changes, you might encode
these with some otherwise unused controller. You would still have to
(manually)-: insert the tempo changes into your Finale doc. OTOH,
transcriptions of MIDI to notation require a fair amount of manual
tweaking anyway, this litte bit extra is perhaps not soooooooooo bad.

Cheers,

Peter

----------------- http://www.prz.tu-berlin.de/~pcastine/ -----------------
Dr. Peter Castine          | I am very pleased to announce that the
4-15 Music & Technology    | 26th International Computer Music Conference
                           | will take place in Berlin in the year 2000.
                           | We look forward to seeing you here!

------------------------------

Date:    Fri, 19 Mar 1999 17:15:57 +0100
From:    Carl Faia 
Subject: Re: Alternate controllers, latency, and performance intimacy

Charles Baker was looking for:

> Alternate controllers, latency, and performance intimacy
>
>    Dear Max list -
>
>I have been toying with the idea of obtaining some alternative controllers
>such as
>the aforementioned i-Cube and the STEIM SensorLab gear...but in talking
>(actual
>voice conversation!) with an experieinced Maxer who had worked with some of
>this gear, and he warned me of latency problems with many of the
>sensors....

Charlie,

I've tried the i-Cube and the SensorLab for a project that required 27
triggers (piezos) for more than 2 octaves of cowbells. Latency was a
problem. I also tried some big name stuff -Yamaha TMX and the  Roland
D-Drums- and found them hard to calibrate (velocity info, parasite
triggering, etc). What I found to work well (low latency and easy to
calibrate), is the Alesis DM5. It comes with various flavours of
drum/percussion samples for your listening pleasure as a bonus :-)

Carl

------------------------------

Date:    Fri, 19 Mar 1999 08:05:32 -0700
From:    Jeff Rona 
Subject: CD Controller

 I had asked anyone if they had a patch that took good control of the cd
object. I got one really cool one that allowed the mouse to control the play
position of the cd.  My goal was to have easy control of a CD during a live
performance, with loop play and stop at end of cut. I put a bunch of buttons
for selecting the cut to make it better for quick access. Here's what I did.
If anyone sees room for improvement, please let me know!

Jeff

max v2;
#N vpatcher 50 40 474 254;
#P hidden message 318 160 14 196617 2;
#P user hslider 230 100 11 15 2 1 1 5;
#P hidden newex 377 343 30 196617 sel 0;
#P hidden newex 343 314 23 196617 abs;
#P hidden newex 457 270 63 196617 unpack 0 0 0;
#P hidden newex 343 293 181 196617 expr ($i1*60 + $i2) - ($i3*60 + $i4);
#P hidden newex 343 343 32 196617 % 60;
#P hidden newex 312 344 29 196617 / 60;
#P comment 343 34 43 196617 Track Selected;
#P number 341 59 35 12 0 0 164 3;
#P hidden newex 352 390 35 196617 gate 2;
#P button 65 65 15 0;
#P hidden newex 350 201 27 196617 + 1;
#N coll ;
#P hidden newobj 350 226 40 196617 coll;
#P hidden message 288 162 22 196617 toc;
#P hidden newex 102 328 53 196617 select 0 1;
#P toggle 6 100 18 0;
#P hidden message 170 419 125 196617 \; dsp driver playthrough 1;
#P hidden message 42 419 125 196617 \; dsp driver playthrough 0;
#P hidden newex 288 138 45 196617 loadbang;
#P hidden newex 189 392 51 196617 closebang;
#P hidden newex 210 333 53 196617 delay 300;
#P hidden button 210 307 15 0;
#P comment 23 81 38 196617 Eject;
#P button 6 78 17 13;
#P hidden message 164 245 31 196617 eject;
#P comment 109 50 23 196617 Sec;
#P hidden message 165 225 41 196617 resume;
#P hidden toggle 159 151 15 0;
#P hidden newex 228 214 27 196617 cd;
#P comment 23 50 38 196617 Resume;
#P button 6 47 17 7;
#P button 6 28 17 5;
#P hidden newex 159 172 62 196617 metro 1000;
#P number 101 31 35 12 0 0 164 3;
#P hidden newex 228 250 68 196617 unpack 0 0 0;
#P number 65 31 35 12 0 0 164 3;
#P hidden message 129 153 14 196617 0;
#P message 147 79 20 196617 21;
#P message 166 79 20 196617 22;
#P message 185 79 20 196617 23;
#P message 204 79 20 196617 24;
#P message 223 79 20 196617 25;
#P message 242 79 20 196617 26;
#P message 261 79 20 196617 27;
#P message 280 79 20 196617 28;
#P message 299 79 20 196617 29;
#P message 318 79 20 196617 30;
#P message 318 63 20 196617 20;
#P message 299 63 20 196617 19;
#P message 280 63 20 196617 18;
#P message 261 63 20 196617 17;
#P message 242 63 20 196617 16;
#P message 223 63 20 196617 15;
#P message 204 63 20 196617 14;
#P message 185 63 20 196617 13;
#P message 166 63 20 196617 12;
#P message 147 63 20 196617 11;
#P message 318 47 20 196617 10;
#P message 299 47 20 196617 9;
#P message 280 47 20 196617 8;
#P message 261 47 20 196617 7;
#P message 242 47 20 196617 6;
#P message 223 47 20 196617 5;
#P message 204 47 20 196617 4;
#P message 185 47 20 196617 3;
#P message 166 47 20 196617 2;
#P message 147 47 20 196617 1;
#P hidden newex 228 174 27 196617 + 0;
#P comment 199 30 100 131334156 Play Cut:;
#P comment 23 30 38 196617 Pause;
#P comment 72 50 23 196617 Min;
#P comment 23 98 32 196617 Audio Mute;
#P comment 261 100 69 196617 Stop at End;
#P comment 84 67 40 196617 New CD;
#P hidden comment 354 183 23 196617 end;
#P comment 175 100 60 196617 Loop Track;
#P hidden connect 65 0 60 0;
#P hidden connect 76 0 75 0;
#P hidden connect 65 0 62 0;
#P hidden connect 54 0 55 0;
#P hidden connect 62 0 47 0;
#P hidden fasten 73 0 69 0 348 335 317 335;
#P hidden connect 74 0 66 1;
#P hidden connect 73 0 70 0;
#P hidden fasten 73 0 74 0 348 335 382 335;
#P hidden connect 72 0 71 2;
#P hidden connect 71 0 73 0;
#P hidden fasten 72 1 71 3 488 290 519 290;
#P hidden connect 70 0 42 0;
#P hidden connect 52 0 51 0;
#P hidden connect 69 0 40 0;
#P hidden connect 66 1 44 0;
#P hidden connect 66 0 8 0;
#P hidden connect 64 0 63 0;
#P hidden connect 45 0 48 0;
#P hidden connect 51 0 47 0;
#P hidden connect 45 0 49 0;
#P hidden connect 49 0 47 0;
#P hidden fasten 63 0 72 0 355 252 462 252;
#P hidden fasten 61 1 58 0 128 371 47 371;
#P hidden connect 57 0 60 0;
#P hidden fasten 61 0 59 0 107 391 175 391;
#P hidden connect 57 0 62 0;
#P hidden connect 57 0 76 0;
#P hidden connect 56 0 59 0;
#P hidden connect 47 0 41 0;
#P hidden fasten 55 0 58 0 215 376 47 376;
#P hidden fasten 47 1 63 0 250 239 334 239 334 223 355 223;
#P hidden connect 39 0 48 0;
#P hidden connect 39 0 47 0;
#P hidden connect 38 0 8 0;
#P hidden connect 43 0 47 0;
#P hidden fasten 41 0 71 0 233 278 348 278;
#P hidden fasten 41 1 71 1 262 274 405 274;
#P hidden fasten 8 0 54 0 233 200 215 200;
#P hidden connect 8 0 48 0;
#P hidden connect 8 0 47 0;
#P hidden connect 8 0 67 0;
#P hidden fasten 8 0 64 0 233 195 355 195;
#P hidden connect 60 0 61 0;
#P hidden connect 37 0 8 0;
#P hidden connect 48 0 43 0;
#P hidden connect 44 0 39 0;
#P hidden connect 36 0 8 0;
#P hidden connect 34 0 8 0;
#P hidden connect 35 0 8 0;
#P hidden connect 33 0 8 0;
#P hidden connect 32 0 8 0;
#P hidden connect 31 0 8 0;
#P hidden connect 30 0 8 0;
#P hidden connect 29 0 8 0;
#P hidden connect 28 0 8 0;
#P hidden connect 27 0 8 0;
#P hidden connect 25 0 8 0;
#P hidden connect 26 0 8 0;
#P hidden connect 24 0 8 0;
#P hidden connect 23 0 8 0;
#P hidden connect 22 0 8 0;
#P hidden connect 20 0 8 0;
#P hidden connect 21 0 8 0;
#P hidden connect 19 0 8 0;
#P hidden connect 18 0 8 0;
#P hidden connect 17 0 8 0;
#P hidden connect 15 0 8 0;
#P hidden connect 16 0 8 0;
#P hidden connect 14 0 8 0;
#P hidden connect 13 0 8 0;
#P hidden connect 12 0 8 0;
#P hidden connect 11 0 8 0;
#P hidden connect 10 0 8 0;
#P hidden connect 9 0 8 0;
#P hidden connect 75 0 66 0;
#P pop;

-------------------
  Be, Hear, Now
jrona@earthlink.net
-------------------

------------------------------

Date:    Fri, 19 Mar 1999 21:54:34 +0100
From:    jvkr 
Subject: Re: using buffer~ loop sync

This way change~ detects the turning point which is then easily processed
into a bang.

johan

max v2;
#N vpatcher 50 40 303 317;
#P button 80 192 15 0;
#P newex 80 93 44 196617 phasor~;
#P flonum 80 70 35 9 0 0 0 3;
#P newex 80 162 34 196617 edge~;
#P newex 80 139 28 196617 >~ 0;
#P newex 80 115 44 196617 change~;
#P connect 2 0 5 0;
#P connect 1 0 2 0;
#P connect 4 0 0 0;
#P connect 0 0 1 0;
#P connect 3 0 4 0;
#P pop;

------------------------------

Date:    Fri, 19 Mar 1999 14:44:53 -0800
From:    William Tsun-Yuk Hsu 
Subject: Re: alternative controllers

I've been using the Icube with a Yamaha VL-70m with a wind controller.
I mostly use some bend sensors in a glove to control parameters for
multiphonics, chaotic oscillation modes etc. I don't play a wind
instrument (I just listen to a lot of them :-)), but I've felt
that the response latency I've noticed are more from the breath
controller and VL-70m than from the Icube.

Sukandar Kartadinata wrote later about noticing latency problems
with an Icube sensor glove (obviously not the primitive home-made
contraption I cobble together!), but it seems to be ok, for what
I'm doing (fine-grain control of how a physical model is driven
into chaos seems to be a bit of a contradiction :-))

By the way, the latest Icubes can work in a standalone mode
without going through Max. The standalone mode software is
pretty restrictive, unfortunately, but it's nice not to have to
lug around a computer.

Bill

------------------------------

Date:    Fri, 19 Mar 1999 21:29:54 -0700
From:    Walter Sheluk 
Subject: IS THAT IT, MAX 3.5?

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> Date:    Thu, 18 Mar 1999 15:42:59 -0500
> From:    Christopher Murtagh
> Subject: Re: IS THAT IT, MAX 3.5?
>
> On Thu, 18 Mar 1999, Walter Sheluk wrote:
>
> > Why has the development of MAX stopped at 3.5?
>
> Why do you think that it has stopped? The current version is 3.5.9, and
> this is rather recent. WinNT4 is older than MAX 3.5, and I haven't heard
> of anyone wondering if they were stopping there.
>
>
> Chris,
>
>

I always thought that when a program numbered such as is now at  MAX
3.5.9 that the programmers have only  fixed something badly written in
the first place. For example, MacOS 8.0  updated to  8.1, or MacOS 8.5
updated to 8.5.1. Then someday when Apple is short cash they will bring
out MacOS X.

Please note that I am not trying to be confrontational in my response. I
just really don't understand the programers coding system for numbering.

Sooo, I was just wondering if MAX has MAXed out and there is simply
nothing new coming.

W

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Date:    Thu, 18 Mar 1999 15:42:59 -0500
From:    Christopher Murtagh 
Subject: Re: IS THAT IT, MAX 3.5?

On Thu, 18 Mar 1999, Walter Sheluk wrote:

> Why has the development of MAX stopped at 3.5?

Why do you think that it has stopped? The current version is 3.5.9, and
this is rather recent. WinNT4 is older than MAX 3.5, and I haven't heard
of anyone wondering if they were stopping there.

Chris,



I always thought that when a program numbered such as is now at  MAX 3.5.9 that the programmers have only  fixed something badly written in the first place. For example, MacOS 8.0  updated to  8.1, or MacOS 8.5 updated to 8.5.1. Then someday when Apple is short cash they will bring out MacOS X.

Please note that I am not trying to be confrontational in my response. I just really don't understand the programers coding system for numbering.

Sooo, I was just wondering if MAX has MAXed out and there is simply nothing new coming.

W --------------EE87A0F2087E9D24D9FE33AC-- ------------------------------ End of MAX Digest - 19 Mar 1999 (#1999-88) ******************************************