Subject: MAX Digest - 4 Feb 1999 to 5 Feb 1999 - Special issue (#1999-43)
Date: Fri, 5 Feb 1999 21:57:52 -0500
From: Automatic digest processor 
Reply-To: MAX - Interactive Music/Multimedia Standard Environments
     
To: Recipients of MAX digests 

There are 15 messages totalling 732 lines in this issue.

Topics in this special issue:

  1. Max Newbie Advice Please (2)
  2. (part 1) video sampling (2)
  3. (part 2) shoko + UnMax
  4. Copyright of MAX Patches and Objects (2)
  5. CD object, again
  6. window frames in 8.5, speed
  7. Call for the 1999 Leonardo Music Journal CD (2)
  8. begin~ again
  9. Video
 10. cycle~ phase init, curve~ bug
 11. MAX, the hard way

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Date:    Thu, 4 Feb 1999 22:24:14 -0600
From:    "D. Studen" 
Subject: Max Newbie Advice Please

Greetings to all Max gurus.  Please enlighten a longtime lurker as to
the best way to proceed in learning MAX from the ground up.  I
originally purchased MAX about 5 or so years ago and it came with a
large black binder manual (still in the box, Ive been to busy I guess).

Question, is this big black thing still the best way for a beginner to
learn?  Considering the fact that at the time MAX was at version 2.1,
I'm a little unsure if it is still valid.  if not, where and how do I go
about getting updated documentation?  Keep in mind I want to begin the
learning process with the CURRENT version of the application.  Are there
3rd party instructional manuals available?

Also, is it possible to study/learn MAX while traveling, say w/a
powerbook on a plane or something?  Is there a way to use the quicktime
MIDI instruments and some type of onboard midi controller or something?
I think it would be awkward to carry an 88 note controller and module as
carry on luggage  :)

Thanks In Advance,
DR Studen

------------------------------

Date:    Fri, 5 Feb 1999 00:35:49 -0500
From:    Stephen Kay 
Subject: Max Newbie Advice Please

>Question, is this big black thing still the best way for a beginner to
>learn?  Considering the fact that at the time MAX was at version 2.1,
>I'm a little unsure if it is still valid.  =

Undoubtedly, if what you want to learn is Max 2.1, then the documentation=

is still valid.  If you want to learn Max 3.0, or Max 3.5.x, then it's
not.  Kind of like any software, eh?

It may be immensely unpopular to suggest it, but I'll do so anyway -
don't bother learning an old, outdated version.  Upgrade to the latest,
and learn that.

>if not, where and how do I go
>about getting updated documentation?  Keep in mind I want to begin the
>learning process with the CURRENT version of the application.

You get the updated documentation by buying the latest version.
Pretty simple :-)  If you are looking for some way to avoid buying
the upgrade and still learn with the latest version, than I
can't help you...

Stephen Kay

------------------------------

Date:    Fri, 5 Feb 1999 00:51:08 -0500
From:    Johnny DeKam 
Subject: (part 1) video sampling

RE Peter Nyboer:

> anyway, about video sampling...
> group, called Emergency Broadcast Network (EBN), uses their own software
> (it looks like it was created in Max, but I don't know if they created
> their own objects), but I haven't ever seen it put to live use.

EBN started out with a small program written in Director, and eventually
collaborated with Kurzweil (yes the Kurzweil) to build a proprietary
hardware solution... at one time, it was rumored that Kurzweil was planning
a commercial release of the hardware product, but that seems to be
vaporware, or has whithered on the vine.  (perhaps it was too costly for
mass production)

> a couple of other software products coming, one of them is Johnny DeKam's
> IVP that has a spec list that sounds absolutely fantastic
(thanks) just wanted to let you know that development is coming along
great!... were on the brink of implementing OMS/Midi -- there will be a
public beta release in late March

> Did anybody see any of the Kraftwerk shows?  (If you did, you probably are
> experiencing some metallic growths on your body by now...)  They had 4
> screens of video that was *almost* always identical (a couple of times,
> there was a slight variation on one of the screens), and it was ALWAYS in
> sync with their music, which, of course, is highly quantized.  I am
curious
> if anyone has any idea on what they used.  I don't know if the clock their
> show ran on was driven from the video, or if the music's clock sync'd the
> video.

If I were going to do this, and improvisation was not a factor (as I doubt
it is in Kraftwerk's case) Than I would send  MIDI time code from a
sequencer and convert it to smpte, and drive a laserdisc or DVD.  (or
perhaps DV tape)

> I want live video in, a bin of movies, a bin of stills, and a bin of
> effects, perhaps Photoshop/After Effects/Premier compatible with as many
> layers as possible (according to the user's system processer speed, drive
> speed, movie data rate etc), with layer "modes" (difference, screen,
> overlay, etc...) and transparency.  An easily accessed "present movie"
mode
> would be wonderful, in which the screen was black except for the movie.
> MIDI control over in/out points for the clips that are playing.   The
> ability to capture the output to a quicktime movie would be marvelous.
> Oh, I want it to import the finest Prociutto and mozzerella from Italy.

Yes, and I would like a quad G6 processor, each running at 2 gHz!
No seriously...  alot of the things your requesting will be apart of IVP.
Where it breaks down is in the realtime compositing of video.  It is
certainly possible to composite video on today's hardware, but the caveat is
that you can't do it without decompressing the video first, and manipulating
it in RGB space - the result is that you will bypass and thus disable any
mpeg or Firewire video hardware you have installed -- the RGB space data
would have to be re-rendered/compressed, which is not realtime as we are all
painfully aware.  This is why both X<>pose and Imag/ine do not support video
hardware, because both program's focus is on realtime effects - pixel
pushing and raster manipulation.  In contrast, IVP is being modeled on
twisted, realtime playback manipulation of pre-rendered clips, very much a
kind of "LiSa" approach to video.  Realtime effects are planned using
Quicktime's effects engine, but as explained, this will disable hardware -
(though you can use a scan converter to steal the RGB display) -- and the
next generation of Apple's may very well playback fullscreen, full motion
video, unassisted by hardware.  (but you would need a huge disk sub system)

This is pretty lengthy for a (technically) off topic post --
 sorry (see next post)

- Johnny

------------------------------

Date:    Fri, 5 Feb 1999 01:18:11 -0500
From:    Johnny DeKam 
Subject: (part 2) shoko + UnMax

As you can see, video - especially live improvised video, is a passion
of mine.  Like Peter, I was tired of the inadequate software out there , and
thus IVP was born - I'm looking forward to its release as much as you!

After the UnMax launch, the positive response, (and heavy traffic I might
add), I've been thinking of building a similar site for digital-video
related topics.  But I'm a bit torn, because UnMax is quite demanding
time-wise, I've been able to muster about 1 or 2 updates a week.  So, this
is my psuedo-plea for help - is there one or two people out there who can
devote a couple hours of their time adding to the wild and wacky UnMax site?
:)  I'm loosely basing this on some other news sites, who are small, and
have just several contributors... but manage to keep content rolling out on
a daily basis.

Such a person(s) would get their own password to node.net - and a fancy
node.net POP email box (if you want it) and full write access to UnMAX.
This is not a job, nor does it require any commitment other than to
contribute some time on a weekly to semi-weekly basis.  Such a person(s) is
also familiar with web authoring, and would maintain the consistent look of
the site.

By the way - I just finished a new update tonight - several faq items, news
items (USB, Firewire & rackmount G3's) and new events/submissions items.

--- So if your an UnMax regular, and want to help, let me know, and then I
could perhaps concentrate a little more on launching this performance video
site - (which could also use contributors!) and not to mention a fresh voice
/ opinion would make UnMax more diverse

 --- if your interested in video stuff, there is a new listserv at Calarts:
lev@shoko.calarts.edu   -- it's still very young - no digest yet, kind of
sleepy, but populated by some interesting folk worldwide, including several
from the MAX list.

Sincerely,

Johnny DeKam
http://node.net/

------------------------------

Date:    Thu, 4 Feb 1999 22:57:02 -0800
From:    dudas 
Subject: Re: Copyright of MAX Patches and Objects

Vincent Puig writes:

>Most of the MAX Patches distributed by Ircam on the Forum Ircam cds are
>public domain but it is safer to check with their authors or on the
>documentation for re-distribution rights (especially if commercial).
>
>MSP patches and objects distributed on the Forum Ircam cds are licensed to
>Forum members only (with rights (like other Forum Ircam software) to use
>them in education, research and music production (no limitations on paying
>or not paying activities)). Re-distribution right is free (and encouraged)
>to Forum members only. Out of the Forum users need a Forum license (or
>membership as we call it).

Clarification of the second paragraph:
MSP patches and objects which are part of the public domain max/msp patch &
external collection (i.e. those which can be found on the public ftp site
ftp.ircam.fr/pub/forumnet/max/) are also in the public domain and thus the
rules of the first paragraph probably apply.

What Vincent is referring to in the second paragraph are the msp externals
and patches made at ircam which are part of the ircam forum msp
distribution:
1) the jimmies (which are quickly becoming quite obsolete, by the way)
2) the ISPW compatibility library. (mostly useles, but includes the handy
pt~ pitchtracker - which does not work as well as fiddle~, but is currently
more stable)
3) Spat (ircam spatializer - I have to admit this is pretty amazing stuff
and includes one of the nicest sounding software reverbs around, debateably
*the* nicest)
4) a few other odds and ends including Chant (fof synthesis)

So, what happens if a composer uses these ircam forum-only modules in a
composition??? Does she need to oblige performers to join the forum in
order to perform the composition in concert?? (unfortunately, some
performers may decide to program another piece, instead...)

I seem to recall that this dilemma can be solved by saving the patch for
the composition as a collective with the ircam modules embedded in the
collective and/or make a standalone application from the patch.  That way
the composition could be distributed to performers, although the individual
modules would not be accessable for potentially unauthorised re-use.  There
should be no problem distributing what you make using the forum msp
objects, as long as you do not re-distribute the forum objects themselves.
I believe Stephen Kay's Mega Max externals have a similar license.

Please correct me if I am wrong.

-R

------------------------------

Date:    Fri, 5 Feb 1999 02:15:05 +0000
From:    MiS 
Subject: CD object, again

Hi all,

I know this has been said here but couldn't find the info anywhere.

If I  remember well the new cd object is out (that supposedly supports IDE
CD-ROM
drives).  Right?

if so, where can I find it?

M.

------------------------------

Date:    Fri, 5 Feb 1999 08:27:58 +0100
From:    Jeffrey Burns 
Subject: window frames in 8.5, speed

Hi geniuses,

Just installed 8.5.1 and found that I can't get rid of the platnum window
frames, which interfere with my multimedia setup. Apparently, a
non-platinum frame has to be installed in the Themes folder. Anybody know
where I can get one?

BTW the new OS sped up quickdraw functions by about 50%, as the code is now
completely native. Speed Doubler had already helped quickdraw by about 30%,
and now it continues to give the same boost over the speed of the new
system.

Incedentally, I read that SGI is soon going to support Windows NT. Does
that mean that we all have to start saving up for a Silicon Graphics
machine?

Jeff Burns

http://www.snafu.de/~jeff

------------------------------

Date:    Fri, 5 Feb 1999 09:45:25 +0100
From:    Guy Van Belle 
Subject: Call for the 1999 Leonardo Music Journal CD

Please forward this message to anyone interested ..
Guy

----------

Call for the 1999 Leonardo Music Journal CD
Title: "Converted to Streaming Between Machines"

Deadline: March 1st 1999.

OK, 1999 today, and whatever you may think about 2000: the millenium bug
is coming! Beware! Panic will rule your life. Nothing will be the same
afterwards again. But hey, relax till New Year's eve 2000. Sit back and
contemplate about the past century.
(e-mail re: *ahem* so now you went for the commercial approach? Throw in
some Millennium fever? hi hi hi On the cover of last week's Time mag: "The
end of the world!?! Y2K insanity! Apocalypse Now! Will computers melt
down? Will society? A guide to Millenium Madness.")

Also the Leonardo Music Journal is in a reflective mood (could that be the
real bug?). Computers, Internet, multimedia: what have we done to music?
Where is the composer, the programmer, the author, the DJ & VJ, the
artist, the broad/netcaster, the kid, the enthousiast, the bricoleur.
Nowadays, what is experimental, new, alternative, and what is along the
lines of tradition? Who is making this all up and who is drawing the
borderlines between genres, social groups, disciplines?
Art, Science & Technology! Is there still an audience, where have the real
people gone, and isn't there anything more to expect than what we find on
the web? Once the wavelets are in the right format, and out there,
transmitted through fiber-optic, and copied from disc to disc. It almost
seems as if the audience consists rather of the millions of machines
keeping the systems running, than the few humans caring to click and
download and listen. We are sitting in a room and waiting and thinking.
Next question: who takes the call?

A WALK THROUGH THE BAZAAR
The current musical landscape seems more diverse than ever before. But if
it is true that all media are converging - that they are translated into
the computer paradigm then, certainly music is doing its best to prove
that right! For any genre, composers have moved to the computer for
editing, synthesis, and mixing. MIDI is where we left it a couple of years
ago, and due to newer processors, we are overwhelmed with software that
allows complex sound synthesis and real-time manipulation. Furthermore,
music and sound are losing their autonomy and a growing number of
'multimedia composers' is getting involved in performances and cd-rom
editions. We are not talking about the high-end super-expensive production
software. Most of this is happening through small-scale and low-cost code,
often programmed by enthusiasts and shared all along by a growing
community of DIY noise makers. Leonardo Music CD wants to show what is
happening with shareware and freeware.
1. Who are the developers?
2. Who are the users?
3. What is your music?
But, who-ever-you-are & what-ever-you-do: take the call!

A DIFFERENT KIND OF CODE(C): BE CONNECTED
Yes, the Internet. Does it become mature so that we can speak of a new
generation of 'netcomposers'? No, this call is not about the new data
types & protocols, but about the new generation of media artists using
sounds and images and working with low data rate transfers. Netcasters
performers, DJ's, VJ's, or just people putting free audio on-line! A
growing number of creative people are building new communities, the link
is the music that streams for ever. Leonardo Music CD wants to show what
is happening out there on the Net.
1. Who are you?
2. Where are your servers?
3. What is your music?
So, who-ever-you-are & what-ever-you-make: take the call!

Finally, if there is anyone out there who feels neglected, or is convinced
this call doesn't touch ground, do contact us. Motivate why sound and
music in 1999 is different, and provide us with the appropriate examples -
euh - samples...

> Just add something saying VERY CLEARLY
> that it is a multi-use CD, which means QuickTime,
> software, hypertexts, graphics, pure audio, etc.,
> and that you are soliciting all of the above.
OK OK: we want to have enough diverse material to compile a cd-extra
(audio + cd-rom on 1 disk). So please, indicate the format of your
contribution. Our policy is to include any (multimedia) format that is
used by contemporary music/sound-related artists.

For more information, mailto: Guy.VanBelle@rug.ac.be.
Get us a short explanation of your proposal, describe the format(s) of
your submission, explain why you have to contribute. We will get back to
you to see what you got. We can provide you with an upload site for small
files, and with a snail address if you want to send a tape or cd-r. Good
luck!

For additional information about the Leonardo Music Journal:
http://mitpress.mit.edu/e-journals/Leonardo/lmj/sound.html

------------------------------

Date:    Fri, 5 Feb 1999 02:26:58 -0800
From:    David Zicarelli 
Subject: Re: Copyright of MAX Patches and Objects

Vincent Puig  writes:

>MSP patches and objects distributed on the Forum Ircam cds are licensed to
>Forum members only (with rights (like other Forum Ircam software) to use
>them in education, research and music production (no limitations on paying
>or not paying activities)). Re-distribution right is free (and encouraged)
>to Forum members only. Out of the Forum users need a Forum license (or
>membership as we call it).

Perhaps Vincent can clarify something. Suppose I'm a Max/MSP user
and I join the IRCAM Forum. I use one of the MSP patches on the
Forum CD-ROM and create a standalone application that I give away
on my web page. I don't distribute the patch itself, just the
application. Since people who are not members of the Forum
could download and use my application, does this violate the
license?

David Z.

------------------------------

Date:    Fri, 5 Feb 1999 15:26:44 +0100
From:    Hans Tutschku 
Subject: Re: begin~ again

>thanks, that works fine..... except for one subpatch (containing a comb~
>filter)
>which crashes Max with a type 3 error every time I send it the mute
message.
>very strange. It's connected to the "aux 3" sends and returns of a bpatcher
>which functions as the master audio section. Perhaps the mute message is
>getting
>to the bpatcher somehow and causing the crash?
>

I'm remembering the same problem and got last year a "global" advise from
Richard D.
to not putting MSP-objects in bpatchers.
Since I'm using just patchers, I don't have problems to switch on and of
any MSP-object.

hope this helps

Richard - can you confirm????

Hans

---------------------------
Hans Tutschku
http://www.multimania.com/hanstutschku

------------------------------

Date:    Fri, 5 Feb 1999 11:10:10 -0500
From:    David Crandall 
Subject: Re: (part 1) video sampling

In regards to Johnny DeKam's remarks about realtime compositing, isn't
that what the media 100 does, and on the card rather than in the CPU?
Someone had mentioned M100 earlier, was that just a playback thing or
would it be possible to have the M100 app open playing an EDL while
controlled by Max either on the same or another computer?

of course changing the parameters of a composite on the fly would be
another story...

dc

------------------------------

Date:    Fri, 5 Feb 1999 11:22:16 -0500
From:    Todd Winkler 
Subject: Video

My most recent dance piece uses David Rokeby's VNS to allow a dancer to
control a video projection using Max. I have continuous control over speed,
start point, end point, and looping. All of the video plays from a standard
Powerbook G3 using the internal 4 MB hard drive and the ix3D Road Rocket to
get video to the projector (acts as a second monitor output). Max performs
beautifully - the video looks great and is very responsive. Here is what I
did:

1. Put the entire video clip in a RAM Disk
This is a trick I learned from Josh Pearson of EBN fame (their original
system, years ago, was Max based). I have 160 MB of RAM on the computer and
created a 125 MB RAM Disk that held a single Quicktime movie containing ALL
of the movie clips that I used for the project. (If you have a very fast
hard drive or an array, this step may not be necessary).

2. Compression
I used Cinepak compression at medium - high quality (you can play with the
quality setting with a trade off of file size vs. quality). I used Media
Cleaner Pro for the compression.

3. Frame Rate
I used 24 fps. If you can get away with 15 fps, that's even better. I can
see the jerkiness of the clip at 15 fps, whereas the motion at 24 fps looks
more realistic. Some people like the 15 fps "look."

4. Sound
To keep the file size down, I used 44.1, 16-bit, mono. (Other accompanying
sounds played in stereo).

5. Playback control
I used the  message to the imovie object to control playback speed
and direction. I used   [rate 50 $]   to get a wide range of speeds to play
with. A negative number to the variable will reverse the direction of the
video playback. Numbers to start/stop individual clips were contained in a
coll. A simple patch controlled loop points and freeze frame.

It goes without saying that the final quality will depend on the original
video source material and your video digitizer.

Finally, the computer was not doing any intensive cpu Max or MSP work at
the same time as the video was running. The setup I describe above works
well with very simple MSP patches running simultaneously, but when I start
pushing the computer, even a little bit,  the video playback suffers. I
have an older Powerbook, so the faster processors should be able to do more
without video playback problems.

_Todd

------------------------------

Date:    Fri, 5 Feb 1999 20:32:30 +0100
From:    Guy Van Belle 
Subject: Call for the 1999 Leonardo Music Journal CD

sorry for any cross-posting
please forward to anyone else
-----------------------------

Call for the 1999 Leonardo Music Journal CD
Title: "Converted to Streaming Between Machines"

Deadline: March 1st 1999.

OK, 1999 today, and whatever you may think about 2000: the millenium bug
is coming! Beware! Panic will rule your life. Nothing will be the same
afterwards again. But hey, relax till New Year's eve 2000. Sit back and
contemplate about the past century.
(e-mail re: *ahem* so now you went for the commercial approach? Throw in
some Millennium fever? hi hi hi On the cover of last week's Time mag: "The
end of the world!?! Y2K insanity! Apocalypse Now! Will computers melt
down? Will society? A guide to Millenium Madness.")

Also the Leonardo Music Journal is in a reflective mood (could that be the
real bug?). Computers, Internet, multimedia: what have we done to music?
Where is the composer, the programmer, the author, the DJ & VJ, the
artist, the broad/netcaster, the kid, the enthousiast, the bricoleur.
Nowadays, what is experimental, new, alternative, and what is along the
lines of tradition? Who is making this all up and who is drawing the
borderlines between genres, social groups, disciplines?
Art, Science & Technology! Is there still an audience, where have the real
people gone, and isn't there anything more to expect than what we find on
the web? Once the wavelets are in the right format, and out there,
transmitted through fiber-optic, and copied from disc to disc. It almost
seems as if the audience consists rather of the millions of machines
keeping the systems running, than the few humans caring to click and
download and listen. We are sitting in a room and waiting and thinking.
Next question: who takes the call?

A WALK THROUGH THE BAZAAR
The current musical landscape seems more diverse than ever before. But if
it is true that all media are converging - that they are translated into
the computer paradigm then, certainly music is doing its best to prove
that right! For any genre, composers have moved to the computer for
editing, synthesis, and mixing. MIDI is where we left it a couple of years
ago, and due to newer processors, we are overwhelmed with software that
allows complex sound synthesis and real-time manipulation. Furthermore,
music and sound are losing their autonomy and a growing number of
'multimedia composers' is getting involved in performances and cd-rom
editions. We are not talking about the high-end super-expensive production
software. Most of this is happening through small-scale and low-cost code,
often programmed by enthusiasts and shared all along by a growing
community of DIY noise makers. Leonardo Music CD wants to show what is
happening with shareware and freeware.
1. Who are the developers?
2. Who are the users?
3. What is your music?
But, who-ever-you-are & what-ever-you-do: take the call!

A DIFFERENT KIND OF CODE(C): BE CONNECTED
Yes, the Internet. Does it become mature so that we can speak of a new
generation of 'netcomposers'? No, this call is not about the new data
types & protocols, but about the new generation of media artists using
sounds and images and working with low data rate transfers. Netcasters
performers, DJ's, VJ's, or just people putting free audio on-line! A
growing number of creative people are building new communities, the link
is the music that streams for ever. Leonardo Music CD wants to show what
is happening out there on the Net.
1. Who are you?
2. Where are your servers?
3. What is your music?
So, who-ever-you-are & what-ever-you-make: take the call!

Finally, if there is anyone out there who feels neglected, or is convinced
this call doesn't touch ground, do contact us. Motivate why sound and
music in 1999 is different, and provide us with the appropriate examples -
euh - samples...

> Just add something saying VERY CLEARLY
> that it is a multi-use CD, which means QuickTime,
> software, hypertexts, graphics, pure audio, etc.,
> and that you are soliciting all of the above.
OK OK: we want to have enough diverse material to compile a cd-extra
(audio + cd-rom on 1 disk). So please, indicate the format of your
contribution. Our policy is to include any (multimedia) format that is
used by contemporary music/sound-related artists.

For more information, mailto: Guy.VanBelle@rug.ac.be.
Get us a short explanation of your proposal, describe the format(s) of
your submission, explain why you have to contribute. We will get back to
you to see what you got. We can provide you with an upload site for small
files, and with a snail address if you want to send a tape or cd-r. Good
luck!

For additional information about the Leonardo Music Journal:
http://mitpress.mit.edu/e-journals/Leonardo/lmj/sound.html

------------------------------

Date:    Fri, 5 Feb 1999 13:08:34 -0800
From:    Simon Gatrall 
Subject: cycle~ phase init, curve~ bug

I have been wrestling with cycle~ for a couple of days and I've come to the
conclusion that it is missing a very basic feature: the abilty to reset the
phase.  Even though the right inlet is supposed to set the phase, I can't
trigger the phase where I want.  Sure you can set the phase relative to
another cycle~, but you can't trigger (with an int message) the phase
absolutely.  Am I missing something?

I'm trying to create a kick drum synth, similar to an analog drum.  I want
to set the initial phase of whatever object generates the waveform.  This
is also a typical feature that many traditional analog oscillators and LFOs
have - some way to retrigger the waveform.  Audio oscillators on many older
synths had an "OSC SYNC" switch which caused one oscillator to be
retriggered by another.  The only way I could figure out to do what I want
is to prerecord many cycles of a sine wave and use a buffer~ with a groove~
in a one shot mode.  By setting the initial playback position, I could set
the phase.  This seems like a really tedious solution.  There must be a
better way, or at least there should be.

I have also found what looks like a bug in the curve~ object (I'm using it
as an envelope).  It will jump to a value instantly (ie in one sample), or
it will slew over a time in multiple milliseconds, but it will not work if
the time value is 1-4 ms.  Why?

Simon Gatrall
gatrall@slip.net

------------------------------

Date:    Sat, 6 Feb 1999 03:58:15 +0100
From:    Sukandar Kartadinata 
Subject: MAX, the hard way

Today I was asked (yet again) if I could build a box that can run MAX/msp
patches w/o a Mac, so I thought it's about time to post this proposal /
questionaire...

h a r d M A X

the basic idea:
build a dedicated DSP-Box (or maybe use something existing) and write a
cross-compiler to fuel it with MAX/msp patches from a Mac (or, well, PC)

(possible) benefits:
1. integration
        - sensor circuitry
        - audio I/O (DAC/ADC, SPDIF, AES/EBU, ADAT, Firewire, USB, etc.)
        - output drivers (relais, motors, extra displays)
        - MIDI (although possibly obsolete with the other integrated
circuitry)
2. non-general purpose OS
        - better latency
        - better timing accuracy
        - higher reliability (?)
3. portability / stage fitness
        - sturdy box
        - sturdy connectors
        - acceptable weight
        - less cabling

questions:
1. Who would be interested ?
2. Has anyone already worked on this issue ?
3. Why is this insane ? Why is this great ? What are your comments ?
Suggestions ?
4. Who would like to cooperate on this project ?

Looking forward to your response
Sukandar

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Sukandar Kartadinata
Custom Music Technology
Hagenauerstr. 6, 10435 Berlin, 030-44051219
http://members.xoom.com/Sukandar/
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End of MAX Digest - 4 Feb 1999 to 5 Feb 1999 - Special issue (#1999-43)
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