Subject: MAX Digest - 6 Jun 1998 to 7 Jun 1998
Date: Mon, 8 Jun 1998 00:00:24 -0400
From: Automatic digest processor 
Reply-To: MAX - interactive music/multimedia standard environments
     
To: Recipients of MAX digests 

There are 8 messages totalling 290 lines in this issue.

Topics of the day:

  1. 
  2. powerbook interfaces/ports
  3. Draw Controllers
  4. MAX Digest - 5 Jun 1998 to 6 Jun 1998
  5. TAN: AOK and OK
  6. list of 1's and 0's -> Binary
  7. A-OK
  8. fft

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Date:    Sat, 6 Jun 1998 21:24:20 -0700
From:    Elliot Anderson 
Subject: 

        What is the easiest way to convert a list of 1's and 0's to a binary
number?  I'm using Bill Vorn's life tools.  The output of the objects is a
list of numbers, in my case 1's and 0's.  I want to combine the output to a
binary numerical value.

Thanks,
Elliot Anderson

Elliot W. Anderson
Lecturer Art, Electronic Media,
University of California at Santa Cruz
ewanders@sirius.com

http://www.sirius.com/~ewanders/

------------------------------

Date:    Sun, 7 Jun 1998 01:01:53 -0500
From:    Johnny DeKam 
Subject: powerbook interfaces/ports

This is just a prediction - (and yes, even a wish)

The multichannel audio for powerbook discussion sparked a thought in my head
which we very well may see implemented,

IEEE 1393 (aka Firewire) which is currently becoming a widespread standard
for Digital Video transfer, would make a robust digital audio interface, and
since it was invented by Apple, it is quite possible that it could be
implemented in future powerbooks, or as a PCMCIA card.

This is reinforced by the fact that some recent multichannel audio devices
are beginning to incorporate IEEE 1394.  The New MOTU digital audio
interface allows you to chain multiple boxes via Firewire.  Other
manufacturers are looking at using Firewire to be the complete, standard AV
interface for all devices... right down to the consumer level.  Even the
lowest grade implementation of Firewire gives 100 MB/s of bandwidth, with
200 MB/s possible now, and projected bandwidth reaching 1 gig/sec.

OK its vaporware, (or is it?) --  I'm currently using a Firewire based video
editing system, and I nearly invested in my own DV camera as an alternative
to DAT, because I could get stereo 16 bit 48k audio and download it right to
my drive just like DAT/SPDIF -- and I get Digital Video on top of that!

I guess what I'm really saying is that this is a great technology, which can
be used in many ways, and has a very open architecture, high bandwidth and
already has an emerging foothold in the AV world.

I would like to see a multichannel audio box for Firewire, and a Firewire on
every computer, and recording device... it might do for AV what MIDI did for
electronic music/synthesizers.

Mention it the next time you talk to (insert favorite hardware vendor here).

Johnny DeKam

------------------------------

Date:    Sun, 7 Jun 1998 12:07:13 +0200
From:    Oeyvind Brandtsegg 
Subject: Draw Controllers

Do anyone out there know of a max object that have the same (or some of
the same) functionality as a common "Draw midi controllers" sequencer
window, found in many commercial sequencers' graphic editing.

Oeyvind Brandtsegg
mailto:obrandts@online.no

------------------------------

Date:    Sun, 7 Jun 1998 10:58:11 +0100
From:    Lawrence Casserley 
Subject: Re: MAX Digest - 5 Jun 1998 to 6 Jun 1998

In message <897192269.209757.0@vm1.mcgill.ca>, Automatic digest
processor  writes

>and why don=B4t Macs have a standart SPDIF link ?

Please make that AES/EBU!!

Lawrence

--
Lawrence Electronic Operations -Tel +44 1494 481381 -FAX +44 1494 481454
Signal Processing for Contemporary Music -email leo@chiltern.demon.co.uk
http://www.chiltern.demon.co.uk

------------------------------

Date:    Sun, 7 Jun 1998 13:31:31 +0200
From:    Peter Castine 
Subject: TAN: AOK and OK

On Sat, 6 Jun 1998 14:35:33 EDT Bruce Meng  wrote:
>The use of OK  to mean all right goes back to an early president (Andrew
>Jackson?) who's nickname was "Old Hickory".  He used to sign off on
>directive's with "OH" -- in his haste, the "H" ended up looking like a "K".
>His aides would simply say that the president said it was "OK" to proceed
>and it grew from there.
>

There are multiple proposed etymologies for 'OK', of which Old Hickory is
only one. Another refers to the chief of an American Indian tribe, but I
forget the details. I've heard one or two others.

I have a suspicion that more than one of these is "correct" in the sense
that people started using the term OK for whatever reason, and that it
took multiple sources to give the term a sufficiently wide base to
actually become a part of common vocabulary.

On a similar line, I note that Gore Vidal reports two _entirely_
different derivations of the word "hooker" in the course of his series of
historical novels (one in _Lincoln_, the other is, I think, in _Empire_).

>Sorry for the extended folklore......

And my apologies for extending the tangent. Follow-ups should probably go
to alt.linguistics.mythology or something.

And, God help us if a couple of more antiorps turn up on other
communications media, because we might then start all using "!nt gum nt"
as a valid mode of expression. I would guess that antiorp himself
(herself? itself?) would be the last creature on the planet who would
wish that to happen.

Cheers,

Peter

-- http://www.prz.tu-berlin.de/~pcastine/ -- pcastine@prz.tu-berlin.de --
"It went down a storm. Brilliant!" 4 Stars           |  Dr. Peter Castine
                                                     +-------------------
_Flutewise_ on my arrangement of Joplin's "The Ragtime Dance" for
4 flutes, alto and bass. (Zimmermann, Order No. 31800)

------------------------------

Date:    Sun, 7 Jun 1998 13:00:54 -0400
From:    Stephen Kay 
Subject: list of 1's and 0's -> Binary

 >       What is the easiest way to convert a list of 1's and 0's to a
binary
>number?  I'm using Bill Vorn's life tools.  The output of the objects is=
 a
>list of numbers, in my case 1's and 0's.  I want to combine the output t=
o
a
>binary numerical value.

Here's one way to do it, using bitwise functions. Example shows 8 bits.
Extend the example for up to 31 bits in Max (largest possible value
for a signed long in Max).

Stephen Kay
---------------------- The MegaMAX Collection ----------------------
 Over 30 Max objects for the creation of more professional looking, =

         feeling, and functioning patchers and applications.
                     http://www.musikinetix.com
                         sk@musikinetix.com
--------------------------------------------------------------------

max v2;
#N vpatcher 50 40 517 334;
#P newex 170 126 215 196617 unpack 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1;
#P message 175 89 75 196617 1 0 0 1 0 1 0 0;
#P newex 170 166 27 196617 << 7;
#P newex 170 187 27 196617 |;
#P newex 199 166 27 196617 << 6;
#P newex 199 187 27 196617 |;
#P newex 228 187 27 196617 |;
#P newex 228 166 27 196617 << 5;
#P newex 257 166 27 196617 << 4;
#P newex 257 187 27 196617 |;
#P newex 286 187 27 196617 |;
#P newex 286 166 27 196617 << 3;
#P newex 315 166 27 196617 << 2;
#P newex 315 187 27 196617 |;
#P newex 344 187 27 196617 |;
#P newex 344 166 27 196617 << 1;
#P number 170 217 113 9 0 0 2048 3;
#P number 170 241 35 9 0 0 0 3;
#P message 201 62 75 196617 1 1 1 1 0 1 0 1;
#P comment 33 50 100 196617 convert a list of 1s and 0s to a binary numbe=
r;
#P connect 18 0 19 0;
#P connect 19 0 17 0;
#P connect 19 1 15 0;
#P connect 19 2 12 0;
#P connect 19 4 8 0;
#P connect 19 3 11 0;
#P connect 19 5 7 0;
#P fasten 19 7 5 1 378 183 366 183;
#P connect 19 6 4 0;
#P connect 10 0 13 1;
#P connect 17 0 16 0;
#P connect 14 0 16 1;
#P connect 15 0 14 0;
#P connect 13 0 14 1;
#P connect 12 0 13 0;
#P connect 11 0 10 0;
#P connect 9 0 10 1;
#P connect 3 0 2 0;
#P connect 16 0 3 0;
#P connect 8 0 9 0;
#P connect 7 0 6 0;
#P connect 6 0 9 1;
#P connect 5 0 6 1;
#P connect 4 0 5 0;
#P connect 1 0 19 0;
#P pop;

------------------------------

Date:    Sun, 7 Jun 1998 01:15:23 -0800
From:    Richard Zvonar 
Subject: Re: A-OK

On Sat, 6 Jun 1998 14:35:33 EDT Bruce Meng  wrote:

>The use of OK  to mean all right goes back to an early president (Andrew
>Jackson?) who's nickname was "Old Hickory".  He used to sign off on
>directive's with "OH" -- in his haste, the "H" ended up looking like a "K".
>His aides would simply say that the president said it was "OK" to proceed
>and it grew from there.

I've also read that it might have stood for "Old Kinderhook" (Martin Van
Buren?) or possibly "Oll Korrekt"

______________________________________________________________________________
Richard Zvonar, PhD                              zvonar@LCSaudio.com
(818) 788-2202 voice                             zvonar@well.com
(818) 788-2203 fax                               zvonar@alum.mit.edu

                          http://www.well.com/~zvonar

------------------------------

Date:    Sun, 7 Jun 1998 21:47:33 +0200
From:    dudas 
Subject: Re: fft

Jem Finer writes:
>I'm trying to get a handle on all this - are there different types of
>convolution therefore or is one not "true convolution" ?

kohnvolushun = multiplikashun (basik-ly)

If you're looking for info on convolution I'd suggest hunting down Curtis
Roads' convolution article from the 1993 ICMC proceedings. It's fun, easy
to read and really informative. I will offer a quote:

"A fundamental law of signal processing is that the convolution of two
waveforms is equivalent to the multiplication of their spectra. The inverse
also holds. That is, the multiplication of two waveforms is equal to the
convolution of their spectra.  Another way of stating this is as follows:

     "Convolution in the time domain is equal to
     multiplication in the frequency domain and
     vice versa."

Thus said, convolution can be a basis for many different kinds of sound
transformations, including filtering, reverberation/spatialization and
modulation.  So the cross dog msp example using convolution (multiplying
the spectra of two signals) would fall into the category of what the
article calls "cross-filtering".

Here's the poop:

Roads, Curtis, "Musical Sound Transformation by Convolution", Proceedings
of the 1993 International Computer Music Confrence, Waseda University,
Tokyo, Japan, pp.102-109.

Anyone who's given up on the convolution function in SoundHack should read
this article, and try again.

-Richard

------------------------------

End of MAX Digest - 6 Jun 1998 to 7 Jun 1998
********************************************