From:
                                                            9/27/97 11:00 PM
Subject: MAX Digest - 26 Sep 1997 to 27 Sep
1997To: Recipients of MAX digests 

There are 3 messages totalling 97 lines in this issue.

Topics of the day:

  1. lossy compression
  2. Thanks
  3. MAX Digest - 25 Sep 1997 to 26 Sep 1997

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Date:    Sat, 27 Sep 1997 02:00:20 -0400
From:    Nick Longo 
Subject: Re: lossy compression

<
Subject: Thanks

Thanks for all the input on my problem.
I have started to notice that this problem also happens with other
programs, but not to the same degree.
Maybe I should try OS8?

Will let you know how it turns out.

Thanks again for all the help.

///Mark - Perpetual Student///

------------------------------

Date:    Sat, 27 Sep 1997 19:17:24 +0200
From:    Peter Castine 
Subject: Re: MAX Digest - 25 Sep 1997 to 26 Sep 1997

Nick Rothwell writes:

>RAM means random access, and is therefore correct.

Except that lots of things are random access. Both my hard disk and my
diskettes are random access media (as opposed to tape, fr'instance, which
is sequential access). RAM is often used in opposition to ROM ("How much
RAM does it have? How much ROM?") although the two acronyms have no
direct relationship to one another, and they certainly aren't antonyms.

>Core memory is that
>which is constructed using threaded ferrite cores. It's also random
>access, although very few implementations of RAM these days are core.

The term "core memory" does indeed derive originally from the use of
ferrite core magnets in constructing a volatile, random access, memory
medium. However, it is also an appropriate description of the main memory
used by the computer (i.e. the memory at the core of the computer).

Anyway, I've got Ted Nelson on my side with this one, thereby bringing
authority enough in this matter to outweigh superior numbers ;-)    (*)

>(When UNIX refers to "core dumps", it is using "core" as an acronym,
>more correctly referred to as "COR-E". The "-E" means executable,
>since a program (not a data file) usually causes the crash, while
>"COR" is an exclamatory term for the event, as in, "Cor! It's not
>supposed to do that."

Oh, and I thought you were being serious. Silly me...

Hey, Nick, if you can find _anyone_ in Murray Hill, NJ, who uses the
expression "cor!" (or "blimey!", or "bluddy 'ell!") I'll by you a beer.
But I warn you in advance: it'll be a Bud, and I don't mean _Cesky
Budjevice_

Cheers, mate

Peter

PS: (*) Apologies for the mangled quote from the Oxford Dictionary.

---------------- http://www.prz.tu-berlin.de/~pcastine/ ----------------
Dr. Peter Castine         | Andrew Lloyd Webber: Why do critics always
pcastine@prz.tu-berlin.de |               take an instant dislike to me?
                          |
                          | Allan Jay Lerner:    Because it saves time.

------------------------------

End of MAX Digest - 26 Sep 1997 to 27 Sep 1997
**********************************************