From:
                                                            9/26/97 11:00 PM
Subject: MAX Digest - 25 Sep 1997 to 26 Sep
1997To: Recipients of MAX digests 

There are 7 messages totalling 212 lines in this issue.

Topics of the day:

  1. Memory Fragmentation (Was: Ram Problems) (2)
  2. Ram Problems (2)
  3. Studio 5
  4. Fixing Memory
  5. lossy compression

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Date:    Fri, 26 Sep 1997 13:35:18 +0200
From:    Peter Castine 
Subject: Memory Fragmentation (Was: Ram Problems)

"Mark R. Petrowsky" asks:
>I have been having problems with the memory manager releasing the memory
>after I quit MAX. The system memory seems to jump to 20megs (I boot up with
>12) and I am unable to open other apps above 10 megs in size even though
>nothing else is running.  Also the numbers in the 'About this computer'
>dialog box don't add up to the 32 megs I have. Is there anything I can do
>to correct this problem?

This sort of thing happens with (to) lots of applications. The symptoms
you report are often caused by another application (usually the Finder)
allocating Temporary Memory. This memory is reported as part of 'System
Memory' by the Finder. This is fair enough, but the problem is that Temp
Memory can be strewn about in core memory(*) in such a way that your
System can't find a single congiguous chunk of memory to do something
useful. Note that the About box tells you what the _largest_ piece of
available memory is. You may have several 1MB chunks of core memory lying
around, but if they aren't contiguous, the system can't use them as a
single multi-MP block. So don't expect all the numbers to add up.

There are a couple of utilities that will give you more detailed
information about memory usage than System About Box (Now Menus, Swatch,
Heap Watcher...). But none of 'em can do much to change the situation.

Mark didn't say which OS version he's running. Younger systems don't have
this problem as much as earlier 7.x releases. Theoretically, closing all
the Finder windows should ameliorate the situation, but it's been rare
when I've found this to make a real difference. The only solution that
always clears things up is to reboot. Did you want to hear that
suggestion? Probably not...

The above discussion simplifies several issues, but I hope it clarifies
things a little for Mark and anyone else who cares.

Cheers,

Peter

(*) Most people refer to core memory as "RAM". The latter term is really
a misnomer, though nowadays almost exclusively used to refer to the
former. O tempore, o mores...

---------------- http://www.prz.tu-berlin.de/~pcastine/ ----------------
Dr. Peter Castine         | Andrew Lloyd Webber: Why do critics always
pcastine@prz.tu-berlin.de |               take an instant dislike to me?
                          |
                          | Allan Jay Lerner:    Because it saves time.

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Date:    Fri, 26 Sep 1997 11:54:14 -0000
From:    Nick Rothwell 
Subject: Re: Memory Fragmentation (Was: Ram Problems)

> (*) Most people refer to core memory as "RAM". The latter term is really
> a misnomer, though nowadays almost exclusively used to refer to the
> former.

RAM means random access, and is therefore correct. Core memory is that
which is constructed using threaded ferrite cores. It's also random
access, although very few implementations of RAM these days are core.

(When UNIX refers to "core dumps", it is using "core" as an acronym,
more correctly referred to as "COR-E". The "-E" means executable,
since a program (not a data file) usually causes the crash, while
"COR" is an exclamatory term for the event, as in, "Cor! It's not
supposed to do that."

--
         Nick Rothwell, CASSIEL        contemporary dance projects
         http://www.cassiel.com        music synthesis and control

             years, passing by, VCO, VCF, and again, and again

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Date:    Fri, 26 Sep 1997 09:32:37 -0700
From:    WALTER SHELUK 
Subject: Ram Problems

Wed, 24 Sep 1997 Mark R. Petrowsky wrote to this Max U.G.:

> I read this somewhere on the list but can't find it.
> I have been having problems with the memory manager releasing the memory
> after I quit MAX. The system memory seems to jump to 20megs (I boot up
with
> 12) and I am unable to open other apps above 10 megs in size even though
> nothing else is running.  Also the numbers in the 'About this computer'
> dialog box don't add up to the 32 megs I have. Is there anything I can do
> to correct this problem?
>
> Thanks in advance.

I am not exactly sure if this will help however perhaps you could try
installing/using the free ware called Mac OS Purge. It seems to wake up
Apple's memory manager to restore that fragmented memory. Works for me
on my Apple 8500/180 PowerMac with 32 megs.

Walter Sheluk/MUSIC PLUS

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Date:    Fri, 26 Sep 1997 09:27:56 -0700
From:    Peter Elsea 
Subject: Ram Problems

>The system memory seems to jump to 20megs (I boot up with
>12) and I am unable to open other apps above 10 megs in size even though
>nothing else is running.

I just dealt with this problem on one of my older machines. The battery
died, and along with forgetting all network and printer settings, 32 bit
addressing comes unglued. With 32 bit addressing off, you have a 10 meg
machine. The finder about box assigns all the other memory to system.

Peter Elsea
Electronic Music Studios
University of California, Santa Cruz
http://arts.ucsc.edu/EMS/Music/index.html
 elsea@cats.ucsc.edu

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Date:    Fri, 26 Sep 1997 14:06:38 -0400
From:    Roland Hemming <100414.2220@COMPUSERVE.COM>
Subject: Studio 5

>Any interesting patches for the Studio 5lx lurking around?

My Theatre Sequencer software (written in MAX) lets you make the studio5
generate timecode for you.

http://ourworld.compuserve.com/homepages/RolandHemming

Roland

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Date:    Sat, 27 Sep 1997 05:30:24 -0400
From:    Johnny DeKam 
Subject: Fixing Memory

>I have been having problems with the memory manager releasing the memory
>after I quit MAX.

I use a nice little utility called "MacOS Purge"
When double clicking its icon, it calls up the 'about this Mac' window,
reclaims all memory which has been stolen by 'badly behaving' applications,
and shows you the results.  Really its the OS that has leaks.  This utility
works great in many situations. (Director also often 'steals' memory and
doesn't give it back).

Sorry, don't the ftp address - nothing a quick search won't solve.
--Johnn DeKam - iEAR Studios, Troy NY

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Date:    Fri, 26 Sep 1997 14:44:24 -0700
From:    Jeremy Roberts 
Subject: Re: lossy compression

>The thing about the Liquid Audio system is that even they
>are willing to admit that what they call "near CD quality"
>isn't necessarily what people will feel like paying for. So
>you can set up your web site so that if people pay for your
>song, you deliver them good ol' 44.1 uncompressed. The other
>compression modes are for *previewing* the song. I think
>musicians and consumers will not be fooled by compression,
>and realize that audio compression, like the music video,
>is about advertising, not performance.

David,

The Liquid Audio people sincerely believe that consumers WILL pay for
lower quality audio for net delivery.

I'll be at AES this weekend, so I can get their official company line,
but since I'm not one to quote columnists from MIX, now's a good time...
St. Croix's column about 4-5 months ago (maybe less) dealt with the lower
standards of excellence that audio pros have been giving into the past
few years.. the so-called "ADATification" of the industry. Not that ADAT
is bad, but that it represents the Mackie/ADAT/-10/unbalanced/so-called
"prosumer" products... now I'm not saying for a SECOND that this is bad,
but I'm agreeing with the writer that levels of excellence have been
lowered... the professional ear has been forced to compromise and the
kids coming up are not getting the shot at critical listening...etc...

I'll be the first to say that this forum is not the place for this
discussion! :-)

>First, I've been working with the AT&T audio compression,
>which to my admittedly not-as-sophisticated-as-Jeremy-Roberts ear
>sounds vastly better than the Dolby stuff Liquid Audio is using.

I'm quite interested in hearing this... and David, flattery will get you
everywhere! But I'm no golden ear... just another guy who can hear the
difference... and feel it.

I'm off to AES, so maybe there are new developments that I'll learn about.

All the best,

jr

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End of MAX Digest - 25 Sep 1997 to 26 Sep 1997
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