From:
                                                            2/26/97 12:00 AM
Subject: MAX Digest - 24 Feb 1997 to 25 Feb
1997To: Recipients of MAX digests 

There are 13 messages totalling 457 lines in this issue.

Topics of the day:

  1. MAX Digest - 21 Feb 1997 to 22 Feb 1997 (2)
  2. list master
  3. DA-88 MMC patch
  4. Duet For One Pianist
  5. Chord recognition
  6. more QT display
  7. Announcement: LEXIKON-SONATE ONLINE... (sorry....)
  8. Audio file play patch (3)
  9. Quicktime stuff
 10. QuickTime and video out

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Date:    Mon, 24 Feb 1997 22:30:58 -0700
From:    Keay Edwards 
Subject: Re: MAX Digest - 21 Feb 1997 to 22 Feb 1997

Hello All,
        A couple of days ago I heard the mention of something I assume is a
MAx
Patch, object or performance called Jeane Claude's "Duets". What is it?
Sounds interesting. Please bring me up to date on this.

Thanks
Keay@hooked.net

------------------------------

Date:    Tue, 25 Feb 1997 01:46:21 -0500
From:    Scott Purman 
Subject: list master

I'm receiving two of each digest, please make sure that my old email address
(now defunct) is unsubscribed:

scott_purman@nile.com

Thank you.
Scott

------------------------------

Date:    Tue, 25 Feb 1997 03:42:08 -0500
From:    Christopher Murtagh 
Subject: DA-88 MMC patch

Greetings all,

I have had a lot of people ask me about my simple patch that uses MMC to
control the DA-88 (providing you have the SY-88 option, of course). So, I
posted it kind of crudely on my web site at:

http://www.islandnet.com/dbp/da-88.html

I also uploaded it to IRCAM's site, but I have no idea where it will go
there, perhaps someone else might know? I put it in the following location:

ftp.ircam.fr/pub/incoming/max-patches

The upload was successful, but the directory was empty (except for my file)
so I would suspect it will get moved somewhere else. Where that might be I
don't know.

Thanks to all who were interested in the patch, and I appreciate any
feedback on how useful it was (or wasn't) and any other comments.

Sincerely,

Christopher Murtagh
David Bartok Productions
http://www.islandnet.com/dbp/dbp.html
*the web page is nowhere near complete, I'm too busy designing
other people's pages to have time to work on mine :-(
****************************************************************
'Will you try to change things using the power that you
have, the power of a million new ideas?' - Robert Lamm
****************************************************************

------------------------------

Date:    Tue, 25 Feb 1997 09:56:03 +0100
From:    Roby Steinmetzer 
Subject: Re: Duet For One Pianist

>        A couple of days ago I heard the mention of something I assume is
>a MAx
>Patch, object or performance called Jeane Claude's "Duets". What is it?
>Sounds interesting. Please bring me up to date on this.
>

"Duet For One Pianist" by Jean-Claude Risset is a set of 8 sketches for
Disklavier and Max software.
It consists of a score to be played by the pianist and several Max patches
to be run on a Mac.
In addition to the pianist's playing, the computer plays a second part.
You can find a detailed explanation in Computer Music Journal 20.1

Roby Steinmetzer
Luxembourg, Europe

------------------------------

Date:    Tue, 25 Feb 1997 11:32:17 +0100
From:    Jeffrey Burns 
Subject: Chord recognition

The recent discussions on chord recognition, as well as the personal help
of Dr. Peter Castine, have been invaluable to me in the preparation of a
real-time chord analyzer for Skriabins late piano music. However, there are
two problems which have not been solved by the examples presented up to
now:
1. Just as in jazz music, the harmonic tableaus of Skriabin are spread over
many octaves, so that crushing them together into one octave with the
"modulo 12" operator distorts their identity and makes them unrecognizable
to the ear.
2. In piano music, the complete harmonic structures are often not presented
all at once, but gradually, employing the ommision or delay of harmonic
members as a means of artistic suspense. Non-harmonic tones, used in
polyphonic contexts, can further distract the recognition system.
To solve both of these problems, I have tried a system that doesn't attempt
to gather complete chord structures. Rather, it looks for essential triads
which the ear recognizes within complex chords and by which we quickly make
approximate assumptions about the nature of the total chord. These hidden
triads can be mathematically spotted even in the modulo compression.
In the case of Skriabin, we are presented with an original harmonic system,
comprising of 24 basic chords, a major and a dominant seventh on each of
the twelve tones. These chords, however, are not the traditional triads;
they are almost always enhanced with additional members, of which the most
notable one is the tritone below the root, which is placed in the lowest
voice.
Using his seventh sonata as a test, I have gleaned three recognition triads
from the beginning of the composition, chords which Skriabin ostensibly
presents as indicators to comprehension of his own harmonic scheme:
1. The opening chord, Bb-Db-A, which implies a dominant seventh chord on
the root of F#.
2. The chord at the end of bar 2, with Ab-D-A in the lower voices, which is
a major chord on the root of D.
3. A simple dominant seventh chord which appears often in the piece, for
example at the 6/8 on page 6, consisting of Bb-D-Ab.
My Skriabin Machine consists of two parts. The first finds the bass note.
(This part is foolproof.) The second searches for the above triads in any
transposition and modifies the indication of the bass-note from the first
part to determine the root and also states whether the chord is major or
dominant seventh. (This part is somewhat capricious but has proven
dependable enough for practical purposes, as far as my tests up to now have
shown.)
Here's the patcher:
max v2;
#N vpatcher 7 37 434 484;
#P toggle 336 344 51 0;
#P number 82 344 71 36 0 0 0 3;
#P newex 227 238 26 196617 0;
#P newex 191 138 28 196617 1;
#P button 292 187 15 0;
#P button 227 213 15 0;
#P newex 227 138 41 196617 % 12;
#P newex 312 162 27 196617 bag;
#P newex 82 284 41 196617 +;
#P newex 276 260 70 196617 Skriabinchord;
#P newex 276 238 42 196617 accum 0;
#P newex 292 213 30 196617 <<;
#P newex 227 187 42 196617 thresh;
#P newex 82 238 41 196617 change;
#P newex 82 304 41 196617 % 12;
#P newex 156 56 50 196617 loadbang;
#P newex 82 162 35 196617 thresh;
#P newex 82 138 27 196617 bag;
#P newex 22 84 57 196617 sustain;
#P newex 68 56 60 196617 ctlin a 64 1;
#P newex 22 56 44 196617 notein a;
#P newex 82 84 55 196617 metro 100;
#P newex 82 213 67 196617 minimum 127;
#P button 64 187 15 0;
#P newex 139 187 27 196617 127;
#P comment 23 30 341 196617 Play late piano music of Skriabin \, using
pedal as usual.;
#P comment 24 344 54 196617 This box shows root of chord. (C=0);
#P comment 227 344 108 196617 This box shows "x" for dominant sevenths \,
shows nothing for major chords.;
#P connect 23 0 16 0;
#P fasten 21 0 20 0 232 159 317 159;
#P fasten 20 0 15 0 317 184 232 184;
#P fasten 20 0 23 0 317 184 297 184;
#P fasten 20 0 16 1 317 210 317 210;
#P connect 19 0 13 0;
#P fasten 18 0 19 1 281 280 118 280;
#P connect 18 1 27 0;
#P connect 17 0 18 0;
#P connect 16 0 17 1;
#P connect 15 0 22 0;
#P connect 22 0 25 0;
#P fasten 22 0 17 0 232 231 281 231;
#P connect 14 0 19 0;
#P fasten 25 0 17 2 232 258 268 258 268 234 313 234;
#P connect 13 0 26 0;
#P fasten 4 0 3 0 69 205 132 205 132 184 144 184;
#P fasten 12 0 24 0 161 78 196 78;
#P fasten 12 0 6 0 161 78 148 78 148 78 87 78;
#P fasten 11 0 4 0 87 184 69 184;
#P connect 11 0 5 0;
#P connect 10 0 11 0;
#P fasten 9 0 10 0 27 133 87 133;
#P fasten 9 1 10 1 74 127 104 127;
#P fasten 9 0 21 0 27 119 232 119;
#P fasten 9 1 20 1 74 107 334 107;
#P connect 8 0 9 2;
#P connect 7 0 9 0;
#P fasten 7 1 9 1 44 79 50 79;
#P connect 6 0 10 0;
#P fasten 6 0 20 0 87 113 317 113;
#P connect 5 0 14 0;
#P connect 3 0 5 1;
#P fasten 24 0 16 0 196 179 285 179 285 205 297 205;
#P pop;
And the subpatcher:
max v2;
#N vpatcher 20 49 605 414;
#P button 544 279 15 0;
#P newex 544 302 21 196617 0;
#P button 513 279 15 0;
#P newex 513 302 23 196617 1;
#P newex 41 198 473 196617 if
(($i1&2057)==2057)||(($i1&19)==19)||(($i1&38)==38)||(($i1&76)==76)||(($i1&15
2)==152)||(($i1&304)==304)||(($i1&608)==608)||(($i1&1216)==1216)||(($i1&2432
)==2432)||(($i1&769)==769)||(($i1&1538)==1538)||(($i1&3076)==3076) then 8
else out2 $i1;
#P newex 30 118 473 196617 if
(($i1&1284)==1284)||(($i1&2568)==2568)||(($i1&1041)==1041)||(($i1&2082)==208
2)||(($i1&69)==69)||(($i1&138)==138)||(($i1&276)==276)||(($i1&386)==386)||((
$i1&552)==552)||(($i1&1104)==1104)||(($i1&2208)==2208)||(($i1&321)==321)
then 0 else out2 $i1;
#P outlet 513 331 15 0;
#P outlet 41 331 15 0;
#P newex 7 45 455 196617 if
(($i1&67)==67)||(($i1&134)==134)||(($i1&268)==268)||(($i1&536)==536)||(($i1&
1072)==1072)||(($i1&2144)==2144)||(($i1&193)==193)||(($i1&386)==386)||(($i1&
772)==772)||(($i1&1544)==1544)||(($i1&3088)==3088)||(($i1&2081)==2081) then
6 else out2 $i1;
#P inlet 7 21 15 0;
#P fasten 8 0 3 0 549 326 518 326;
#P connect 6 0 3 0;
#P connect 9 0 8 0;
#P connect 7 0 6 0;
#P connect 0 0 1 0;
#P fasten 5 0 2 0 46 280 46 280;
#P fasten 5 0 7 0 46 257 518 257;
#P fasten 4 1 5 0 498 187 46 187;
#P fasten 4 0 7 0 35 176 518 176;
#P fasten 4 0 2 0 35 291 46 291;
#P fasten 1 1 4 0 457 109 35 109;
#P fasten 1 0 2 0 12 291 46 291;
#P fasten 1 0 9 0 12 103 549 103;
#P pop;

------------------------------

Date:    Tue, 25 Feb 1997 11:12:37 -0600
From:    Ken Gregory 
Subject: Re: more QT display

>>i have the
>>patch to hide the menu bar but the QT window and the patch has a title bar
>>etc.

Use the imovie object instead of the movie object. Resize and hide your
patch window behind the QT window. Or behind the black frame mentioned in
my last post.

Cheers,
ken

Ken Gregory   kgregory@pangea.ca
ph. 204-942-7510                fax 204-942-1555
704-138 Portage Ave. East,  Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada  R3B 1G7

------------------------------

Date:    Tue, 25 Feb 1997 19:17:05 +0100
From:    "Dr. Karlheinz Essl" 
Subject: Announcement: LEXIKON-SONATE ONLINE... (sorry....)

LEXIKON-SONATE ONLINE...

LEXIKON-SONATE, an infinite interactive realtime composition for
computer-controlled piano, was originally implemented as a computer program
(written in MAX) which used to run only on Apple Macintosh computers:

     http://www.ping.at/users/essl/works/Lexikon-Sonate.html

Since recently, this piece is also available on the Web and you can listen
to its completely unforeseeable music online. Please point your browser to:

     http://www.ping.at/users/essl/works/lexson-online.html

There are existing two different versions:

* an interactive, form-based CGI-script where you can combine the various
musical structure generators at will;

* a non-interactive Javascript implementation which will play a new version
every time you reload the page (be surprised!);

System Requirements:

A Web browser which is capable of playing different MIDI-files at the same
time; a Javascript-savy browser is obligatory for the Javascript version.
Best results have been obtained with Netscape 3.0 (with installed
LiveAudio-PlugIn) on an Apple Macintosh computer with Quicktime 2.5.

Dr. Karlheinz Essl
SAMT - Studio for Advanced Music & Media Technology
Bruckner-Konservatorium Linz / Austria
www:   http://www.ping.at/users/essl/index.html

________________________________________________________________________
     Visit the MindShipMind - an interactive multimedial Web Oracle
          http://www.ping.at/users/essl/works/mindshipmind.html
________________________________________________________________________

------------------------------

Date:    Tue, 25 Feb 1997 19:23:51 +0000
From:    Nick Rothwell 
Subject: Re: Audio file play patch

>I am a novice max 3.0 user, PPC 7200AV 32meg {64 with Ramdblr}

Blue Alert!

You use RAMDoubler and *live*?

         Nick Rothwell, CASSIEL        contemporary dance projects
         http://www.cassiel.com        music synthesis and control

             years, passing by, VCO, VCF, and again, and again

------------------------------

Date:    Tue, 25 Feb 1997 15:21:52 -0500
From:    David Crandall 
Subject: Quicktime stuff

On Mon, 24 Feb 1997, Steve Anderson wrote:

>         Reply to:   RE>MAX Digest - 22 Feb 1997 to 23 Feb 1997
> >Subject: Quicktime stuff
> >does anyone have any ideas on how to get a totally black screen with
just...(etc)

> Try using the "Hide Others" option from the application menu, in
the...(etc)

Also in "General Controls" control panel, you can set the finder to only
show the active app.

------------------------------

Date:    Tue, 25 Feb 1997 17:21:09 -0500
From:    Bill Vorn 
Subject: Re: Audio file play patch

On Mon, 24 Feb 1997, Eric Singer wrote:
> Try "AiffPlayer" (newer version of AiffPlay), available from the usual ftp
> sites as well as my web page (see below).  This will allow you to do what
> you want.

Is "AiffPlayer" compatible with the new Audiowerk8 card from Emagic?
(AW8 is a 2-in 8-out PCI card which sells for about the same price as
AMIII)

Bill Vorn
Montreal (Quebec) Canada

------------------------------

Date:    Tue, 25 Feb 1997 17:31:17 -0500
From:    Eric Singer 
Subject: Re: Audio file play patch

On Tue, 25 Feb 1997, Bill Vorn wrote:

> Is "AiffPlayer" compatible with the new Audiowerk8 card from Emagic?
> (AW8 is a 2-in 8-out PCI card which sells for about the same price as
> AMIII)

AiffPlayer uses the Sound Manager to play either mono or stereo AIFF
files.  If the card includes driver software to allow you to route
Mac audio out of the card from the Sound control panel, AiffPlayer will
probably work.  You will not be able to get it to route out of more than a
stereo pair of outputs at a time, however.

Eric

**********************************
*                                *
*          Eric Singer           *
*    Media Research Laboratory   *
*       New York University      *
*   email: esinger@cat.nyu.edu   *
*  web: http://cat.nyu.edu/eric  *
*                                *
**********************************

------------------------------

Date:    Wed, 26 Feb 1997 09:51:09 +1100
From:    Garth Paine 
Subject: Re: QuickTime and video out

I have noted with interest the discussion re Quicktime output.

I have done a couple of installations which outputed video and animation to
projectors for intereactive immersive environments.  The first time we
wrote some code to run AVI files on PC's and taged time code points with
MIDI note number addresses.  This worked OK but was not very flexiable.
The installation I have at Linden Gallery in Melbourne Australia at the
moment (Ghost in the Machine) outputs interactive  realtime animation and
video.  I have used Macromedia Director (running on Power Base 200 and Mac
PPC8100AV) as the platform to control and output the visuals.  I use the
serial ports.  There is a Movie Lingo script in Director that accepts RS232
strings from a central control computer running MAX (PPC6200).  This allows
you to send the Movie anywhere you have placed a marker or to any frame or
any position relative to a marker.  You can change the playback rate and a
variety of other characteristics such as colour palettes etc.  One problem
is that this requires two machines because MAX doesn't do it's stuff well
in the background.  I prefer to keep the control and video on seperate
machines because it lessens the possibility of the whole lot going down at
once.  I have not had any reliability problems using this set up.  Another
advantage is that you can control a number of animation/video output
machined from one central control conputer by allotting different defining
characters in the control string, or simply by using a serial splitter.

Thats my two bobs worth - hope it throws another option in there for those
developing approaches to interactive video output.  By the way, you don't
need to run Macromedia Director on the output machines, just make a
projector that loads the movie at start-up.  This also allows flexibility
in changing the video/animation content easilly during the run of the
installation.

Garth Paine

<><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><>
ACTIVATED SPACE
INTELLIGENT INTERACTIVE ENVIRONMENTS
MUSIC COMPOSITION, SOUND DESIGN for Theatre, Film, Video, Multimedia
Phone   +61 3 95259844     mobile-0412-118292
Fax        +61 3 95275549
GARTH PAINE
<><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><>

------------------------------

Date:    Wed, 26 Feb 1997 00:53:22 +0300
From:    Nikos Vittis 
Subject: Re: MAX Digest - 21 Feb 1997 to 22 Feb 1997

I need information on how to unsubscribe. Thank you

Nikos Vittis @ Chloe Balla
Aiginitou 33-35
11528 Athens
Greece

tel/fax: (301) 7482431

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End of MAX Digest - 24 Feb 1997 to 25 Feb 1997
**********************************************